Product Review: Trader Joe’s Sprouted Tofu

Why Sprouted? (we’re beyond ‘Why Tofu?’, right?!) Regular tofu is made from cooked soybeans while sprouted tofu is made from sprouted soybeans. Sprouted tofu is easier to digest (sprouting softens the beans and releases troublesome phytates), and is richer in protein, calcium, and iron. Too good to be true? Nope! Sprouted T is similar in calories, slightly lower in carbohydrates, and slightly higher in fat (but the good omega-3 fish-oil type).

Getting soy foods into your cauldron is a pretty good idea. They help lower blood pressure and cholesterol, especially the bad, garbage-on-the-curb-of-your-arteries LDL kind, while also curbing diabetes and preventing cancer and its recurrence.

Sprouted tofu is used just like regular tofu (in Chocolate Mousse, or any of these 200 recipes), but what about the taste? Sponge-tastic? I surveyed Team Reilly in comparison to Trader Joe’s organic regular extra firm tofu (which is a family favorite). Both tofus were uncooked and untouched.

During a blind taste-test, I asked the team which one they preferred and if they could tell which one was sprouted.

Results:
Bitchin’ Dietitian: Preferred the softer-textured sprouted tofu, and of course knew it was the sprouted tofu b/c she made up the test.
Bitchin’ Husband:  Thought the regular tofu had more flavor, and that the sprouted tofu wasn’t bad, but tasted like nothing. Guessed that the one he preferred was the sprouted tofu, but it was actually the regular tofu.
5-Year-Old: MUCH preferred the sprouted tofu and ate more than her taste-test serving, but thought it was the regular one.
3-Year-Old: MUCH preferred the regular tofu and ate more than his taste-test serving, but thought it was the sprouted one.
1-Year-Old: Didn’t have a preference, and ate both quite vigorously. When asked which one he thought was the sprouted one, he said “eh eh eh.” Translation:  “the one on the left” (the sprouted one).

Interpretation of Results:
Sprouted tofu–with its easier digestion, higher levels of protein, calcium, iron, and omega-3 fats–is a groovy alternative to regular tofu. Since few people eat tofu raw (thank your lucky stars you weren’t part of today’s test), stir-frying, and adding flavors to tofu will change both types similarly. Sounds like a Sprout-Out for TJ’s Sprouted Tofu!

Recipe op?… What are your favorite ways to do tofu, or, now, sprouted tofu?

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10 Responses to Product Review: Trader Joe’s Sprouted Tofu

  1. Pingback: Week 12 | Kyla's Kitchen: The Blog

  2. Nate says:

    I wasn’t a fan of tofu or soy at ALL … Until I got this bitchin’ awesome, super high protein, wonderfully textured sprouted tofu from Trader Joes today!

    It has the texture and consistency of soft sliced mozzarella and goes AMAZINGLY WELL goes guacamole, humus and spices on a rice cake. Yum yum yum!

    Sprouted organic tofu for the win! Each package contains 90g (NINETY) total grams of vegan protein… For only $1.99.

    Highly recommended. Safe for human and male consumption. See Wikipedia for more info:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soybean#Health_benefits

  3. emilie123 says:

    Just saw and tried this product yesterday.
    It is now a major item on my shopping list. :-)

  4. Eric says:

    We love using this every week – no funky tofu aftertaste like some others have.
    I’ve created a couple of recipes that work great with it. One is a Caprese salad idea where I sate the tofu in olive oil and basalmic vinegar for a short while, then pile them into short stacks layered with fresh sliced tomatoes and basil leaves, ground black pepper on top.

    • Jen Reilly says:

      Sounds amazing, Eric! I need to start buying this stuff again. I’m hooked on the organic extra firm, and tend to only get the sprouted when the other is out. The sprouted is delish though! xoxo Jen

  5. Pingback: Tofu and Veggie Stir-Fry | corkandspoon

  6. Rita says:

    What a great site, I look forward to buying your book. I wanted to offer one slight corrections, n-3 fatty acids in soy aren’t quite as good as the longer chain EPA and DHA found in fish, the conversion ratio for ALA up to EPA is only ~5% for men and ~19% for women.

    • Jen Reilly says:

      Thanks Rita! I generally recommend DHA from seaweed and ALA from flax or chia seeds to convert to heart-healthy EPA if people want a non-fish source. Soy has some, but you’re right, not a super source. :) – Jen

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