Making Raw Hemp Milk Couldn’t Be Easier – Video!

Raw Hemp Milk
Makes 4 cups

1 cup hemp hearts (shelled hemp seeds)
4 cups filtered water

Blend, and store in the fridge for up to 5 days. Add to smoothies, pudding, desserts, soups, or cereal. High in protein, fiber, and Omega-3’s. Yum!

 

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2 Must-Drink Summer Power Smoothies

I’m on a new kick this summer — I’ve dropped the breakfast oatmeal and bran flakes and have become a blending maniac! EVERY morning, I throw a bunch of colorful plant matter plus some seeds and perhaps a yummy powder into my Vitamix, blend it, and go. If there are leftovers, I pour them into sealed glass jars and guzzle later in the morning. Here are my 2 favorite blendcoctions:

Daiquiri Power Tower

Daiquiri Power Tower

Chia Daiquiri
Makes 3 12-ounce portions

2 cups frozen organic strawberries
1 banana
Handful organic kale leaves (lacinato or dinosaur kale are my fave), spinach if the kale is too kale-ey
1/4 cup chia seeds (get them at Costco: $10 for a 2-lb. bag): Awesome source of LDL cholesterol-lowering soluble fiber and heart-healthy Omega-3’s
3 cups fortified non-dairy milk such as unsweetened coconut milk: Great source of calcium and vitamin D
1 scoop Vanilla Almondilla Vega One Energizing Smoothie powder: Superstar for protein, fiber, and sweetened with stevia so low-sugar too!

Blend, pour, and go!

Nutrition Info per 12-ounce serving: 246 calories, 12 g fat, 6 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 22 g carbohydrate, 14 g fiber, 10 g sugar, 11 g protein, 90% vitamin A, 141% vitamin C, 30% vitamin D, 25% calcium, 14% iron.


Brown Hippie
Makes 3 12-ounce portions

Not pictured, because you might not try it! It’s brown, people. Close your eyes and enjoy!

1 cup frozen organic blueberries
1 cup frozen mango chunks
banana
Handful organic spinach leaves
3 cups fortified non-dairy milk such as unsweetened soymilk: Great source of calcium and vitamin D
1 scoop vanilla hemp protein powder (such as the one from Trader Joe’): Super rich in protein, Omega-3’s, and insoluble fiber
1 frozen cube wheatgrass juice (optional): adds nature’s richest edible source of chlorophyll – a natural detoxifier and blood pressure reducer

Blend, pour, and go!

Nutrition Info per 12-ounce serving: 220 calories, 5 g fat, <1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 33 g carbohydrate, 8 g fiber, 19 g sugar, 12 g protein, 31% vitamin A, 37% vitamin C, 30% vitamin D, 32% calcium, 25% iron.

Ta da! 🙂

Pumpkin Spice Latte in Your Own Bitchin’ Kitchen

I could be Charles. I’ve already had and thoroughly enjoyed several Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Lattes this year (decaf, soy, no whip, SO good). Especially as a past Starbucks barista who got free drinks “for taste-testing” ’round the clock, it’s hard to justify spending too much cashola on a coffee drink–even the Pumpkin Spice Latte. So, I’ve created my own version–much cheaper, and highly more convenient if you have a craving while at home. And no espresso machine needed!

Pumpkin Spice Latte
Makes 1 12-ounce drink

6 ounces brewed double-strength coffee (leaded or unleaded, your choice)*
6 ounces vanilla non-dairy milk (I used soymilk)
1 Tbsp pumpkin butter or apple butter (or 1 Tbsp pumpkin purée plus 2 tsp sugar)
1/8 tsp pumpkin pie spice (or a dash of cinnamon plus a dash of nutmeg) 

Brew coffee. While coffee is brewing, heat milk, pumpkin butter or apple butter (or pumpkin purée plus sugar), and spice(s) in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Stir vigorously with a whisk until ingredients are evenly mixed and it starts to bubble. Pour coffee and milk mixture into a large mug. Pull out your laptop, turn on some jazz, sip the latte, and enjoy the moment. A true coffee shop experience!

Nutrition info per latte: 107 calories, 2.5 grams fat, 5 grams protein, 13 grams sugar, 225 mg calcium.

*1 cup in most coffee makers makes 4 ounces of coffee. Therefore, for 1 latte, brew 1 1/2 cups (6 ounces) using 3 scoops of ground coffee

Who’s ready for a homemade version of the Gingerbread Latte or the Peppermint Mocha? Stay tuned!

Cow-less Milk

Photo by: Tasty Yummies

Milk alternatives are on the up and up, and with them, our health. Here is a cool rundown of the main milk alternatives (almond, coconut, hemp, rice, and soy) and their pros and cons by dietitian Eliza Zied.

Personally, I like protein-rich unsweetened soy milk in my cereal and vanilla almond milk in my latte, and my kids down vanilla and chocolate versions of both like they’re going out of style. As for “too much soy”, up to 25 grams a day of soy protein is incredibly heart-healthy and wildly cancer-preventative. One cup of soymilk has 7 grams of soy protein. And if you’re wanting to replace buttermilk in a recipe, you must mix 1 cup soymilk with 1 Tbsp lemon juice until it curdles. Since protein is necessary for the desired curdling, it won’t happen with the lower protein milk alternatives.

While slightly harder to find (go to a health food store or Whole Foods Market), other great dairy alternatives include oat milk and hazelnut milk as well as multigrain milks. Oat milk is higher in calories (130 per cup of the Original variety), but moderate in protein (4 grams per cup) and fiber (2 grams per cup), and higher in sugar (19 grams per cup of the Original variety). Hazelnut milk has 110 calories, 2 grams protein, and 14 grams sugar per cup of the Original variety. And if you’re feeling extra daring, you can make your own non-dairy milks, which is far easier than trying to make your own dairy milk. Here’s a great step-by-step for homemade almond milk. Cheers to health and cheers to life!

Other whens and hows with dairy alternatives?

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